Is Your Menu Missing Something?

Your dinner menu lists appetizers, right? Or maybe “Starters” or “Small Plates” or a clever synonym suggesting that this is where you start your meal.

But really, it isn’t the start, is it? I mean the start is usually a beverage. Perhaps you offer a beverage menu or a table tent that promotes beverages. OK.

"I wonder where the cocktails are..."

But experts suggest that you (also) list drinks, including wines, on the food menu.

January 26 was interesting for me. That morning I was asked by a client to review a dinner menu for a top notch hotel in the upscale segment.

The dinner menu I reviewed had no cocktails, beers or wines listed anywhere. This isn’t unusual for hotel dinner menus. The menu did have coffee, milk and juice. I recommended enhancements which would put select beverages at the top left of the menu, at the beginning. Why not let the menu “begin at the beginning”?

That same afternoon I attended 2011 Cheers Conference (www.Cheersconference.com) in New Orleans, and an excellent presentation (one of many at the Conference) – Menu Trends:  What the Top 25 Chains Are Pouring. The presenter was Michael J. Ginley, a Partner at Next Level Marketing (http://www.nextlevel-co.com).  Ginley suggested that 86% of the top twenty-five full service restaurant chains list at least “some” drinks on their menus. He then stated that he was puzzled that the number isn’t 100% since there is evidence that the practice improves sales.

But there’s more. In October 2009 I published a blog “How to Sell Less Wine”. In it I cited the remarkable Cornell wine list placement study. Thanks to Sybil S. Yang and Michael Lynn, Ph.D., and The Center for Hospitality Research at Cornell University we now understand which wine list attributes correlate to increases in wine sales. In their breakthrough finding, “Wine List Characteristics Associated with Greater Wine Sales”  [Cornell Hospitality Report, Vol. 9, No. 11, July 2009, http://tinyurl.com/6c8tsc9], Yang & Lynn detail how they meticulously studied the wine lists and wine sales of 270 restaurants spanning several major markets.

In my blog I summarized the findings, and now refer to this one: Wine list design: only two attributes were found to correlate to higher wine sales: placing the list on the menu (instead of a separate book), and not using the dollar sign ($).

Are you using your dinner menu to optimize beverage sales?

Those are my thoughts, let me know yours.

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