Archive for May 10th, 2010

How to Manage a Light Bulb

Let’s get this out right now: this is not “how many _______ does it take to screw in a light bulb” or anything like that. I’m not good at screwing in light bulbs. My wife will ask her seven-year-old daughter to replace a bulb, before she’ll ask me. Sure, I’m exaggerating. Sometimes she asks the ten-year-old.

But once that bulb is in, I can manage it as well as anyone. No so at some bars and restaurants I’ve seen in hotels. Bright lights in the bar. Bright lights at dinner. Lighting levels that change dramatically for no apparent reason. Lighting levels that differ from area to area within a restaurant or lounge, for no apparent reason.

Light Bulb Energy

We often overlook the importance of managing lighting levels. Lighting levels? How about music levels? Type of music? And TV’s. What’s showing – and why? It’s 9 o’clock, do you know where your mute button is? Do your guests like the cacophony of three separate programs blaring in your bar? We don’t understand why our places are sometimes empty, yet we’ve effectively killed any and every opportunity for energy.

How do you fix this? Sure, sometimes a better speaker or two and an additional dimmer switch might be required. But mostly it’s about strategy and scheduling.

We schedule our teams to service the guest. Every week. No problem. So why can’t we schedule the environment in which the guest will be served as well? The answer is, we can. Here’s one way to do it.

Make a grid for each outlet, with the hours of operation in columns, an hour for each column. TIP: if the outlet is open to or visible from a public area when closed, it’s just as important to manage its look and “feel” for that time period as well.

First, The FORECAST

At the top row, write “customer” – who is the customer you are targeting each hour the outlet is open?

Next row, write “occasion” – what is the occasion of their visit? Breakfast (re-fueling)? Meeting? Unwind after work? Unwind after meetings? Returning from dinner outside the hotel? Etc.

Finally, third row, write “energy level” or “mood” or whatever best sets the tone for the “feel” you want to support.

Now, the SCHEDULE

Record the appropriate level or channel or number for each hour, for each of the managed ambience items, including:

  • Lighting level #
  • Music volume
  • Music channel
  • TV station (mute except for scheduled “events”)

You will have multiple light controls, multiple TV’s, etc. And you can add items – maybe how the bar looks (“meal set” for certain hours, for example).

Recently I was at a smartly managed hotel in the New York area and the Lobby Lizard – here known as a Lobby Ambassador – has a checklist that includes six items that influence bar atmosphere, and they are checked multiple times each evening. I like that.

Teach your lizard how to manage that light bulb.

Those are my thoughts, let me know yours.

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