Method to the Madness: Part I, Hotel F&B Concepts

So, “Why is a raven like a writing desk?” What is the right concept for our hotel restaurant? And, do either of these questions have a definitive answer?

Maybe. At GVC we use a 7-part “methodology” to create a concept. It’s not rocket science, right? Perhaps it’s more difficult than rocket science, since thousands upon thousands of very experienced and bright folks have failed at it, one time or another. An outline of the seven steps methodology can be found at the GVC web site. Here I’ll go into a bit more detail.

Stephen R. Covey’s seminal The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People says (habit 2), “Begin with the end in mind”. https://www.stephencovey.com/7habits/7habits.php. Well, if I knew exactly what the final concept should look like, I could skip the methodology. But Covey is right – let’s figure out what it has to be like, let’s begin by determining the criteria by which success will be judged. What must the concept achieve to be called successful?  If the concept doesn’t meet the criteria, then it won’t work.

In general, a concept within a hotel should support the hotel’s brand image. For example, a concept for a Holiday Inn hotel could be too upscale, while the reverse holds true for a Ritz Carlton. I recall having to convince a senior hotel executive that he should abandon his plans to make a Waffle House (albeit a successful company and brand) the exclusive restaurant for a Crowne Plaza hotel (another successful brand).

A second criterion concerns the hotel’s functional needs. How must the concept “serve” the hotel? Which meal periods must be offered? Which services (food, beverage, to-go, room delivery?). What are the hours of operation that a successful operation must serve the hotel? And what is the expected profit contribution to the hotel?

Next, what is the restaurant’s role? Is it to be a destination or an amenity? In other words, is its purpose to draw local guests or to service the hotel guest? Most often the answer is a complicated combination of these two perspectives, but the discussion needs to occur early in the process.

A fourth criterion requires a primary Unique Selling Proposition – a feature that differentiates it – and the hotel – from the competition. A final concept will have many special attributes, but it should have a prime USP that defines it, enables us – and our customers – to talk about it. But it’s too soon to say what that should be – that comes with ideation.

Chains will sometimes add that they should be able to duplicate the concept in other hotels. This will spread the development costs and will serve to give the hotel brand a talking point as well. It will further help optimize the company’s resources, and support its development team.

The test of these and other criteria is this: if the concept fails to meet one of the criteria, can it still be judged a success?

Perhaps you can think of additional criteria. I’d love to hear from you. In the meantime, how about the answer to that riddle?

“Have you guessed the riddle yet?” the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.
“No, I give it up,” Alice replied. “What’s the answer?”
“I haven’t the slightest idea,” said the Hatter.
“Nor I,” said the March Hare.
Alice sighed wearily. “I think you might do something better with the time,” she said, “than wasting it in asking riddles that have no answers.”

These are my thoughts, let me know yours.

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  • Comments (1)
  1. like tour advise to the Crowne Plaza …you need to know yourself a swell as you know your enemies” I fear for the Sr Mgt of this hotel as he certainly is not aware of his own brand or guest.
    Secondly, this is old school but still one of the requirements of staying in business…what is your core competency? and are you focused on this or are you off on a ego trip or even worse …hiding under th ecovers and doing th easy?
    Thanks Ned for giving us this platform

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